G. FRAUDLENT/ALTERED DOCUMENTS AND RECIPIENT FRAUD PENALITIES

 

Fraudulent/
Altered Documents

The information in this section provides instructions regarding the actions to take when potentially fraudulent and/or altered documents are presented by the applicant/recipient. Care must be taken in the evaluation of all verifications provided by the applicant/recipient.  Each verification must be reviewed to ensure that it is consistent with prior information.

 

 

Birth Verification

The birth verification presented should be reviewed and compared to any previous information, application statements and case record documentation.

 

·       A certified birth record should have the official government seal of the birthplace.

               

·        Most birth certificates are printed on a high quality paper that has watermarks and the border should have slightly raised print, referred to as intaglio, which is rough to the touch.

 

·       Legitimate birth certificates will usually not have erasures, white out marks or be altered in any manner and any such alterations should make the document immediately suspect.

 

 

DMV Identification Card or License

The physical description and other identifying factors on the DMV Identification Card or License presented to establish identification must be compared to the person and any other documentation available.

 

 

 

Social Security Card

The appearance and feel of the Social Security Cards presented should be as described below:

·       Social Security Cards issued by Social Security Administration have raised printing, referred to as intaglio.

 

·       The print on legitimate Social Security Cards is clear, the typing   does not overlap the borders, which are sharply in focus, the words "Social Security" are shaded and there are small colored dots on the paper stock of the card. 

 

Note:  This description applies to current card stock. There were previous formats used by Social Security that are still valid.

 

 

Alien Registration Card

The information on the Alien Registration Card should be consistent with information in the case record and should appear unaltered.

 

·       Fraudulent cards often do not have the same "A" number on the front and the back; both sides of Alien Registration Cards should be checked to ensure the numbers match.

 

·       The seal on legitimate Alien Registration Cards is imprinted on the card just barely touching a portion of the left side of the person's picture.

 

 

Actions to Take

Potentially fraudulent or altered documents should not be accepted as documentation to establish eligibility.  Staff is to take action to document the situation and to gather information for a fraud referral.

 

 

Analyze the Document

Staff is to examine the potentially fraudulent or altered document to determine all the specific reasons he/she believes the document is not legitimate.

 

·       An enlarged copy of the document will be made by staff and retained in the case file.

 

·       Staff will write a complete narrative entry with specific information about the specific documentation that appeared fraudulent/altered.

 

·       The applicant/recipient shall be informed that the documents presented are not acceptable and asked to sign a release of information so original documents can be requested.

 

·       Staff will then return the documents to the applicant/recipient, as there is no legal authority to confiscate personal property.

 

·       Staff will attempt to verify any potentially fraudulent or altered document themselves (e.g., ordering birth certificates, using SAVE for INS documents, running DMV for verifying CDLs, etc.).  Attempt efforts shall be fully documented in the case record.

 

·       When staff is unable to establish if a document necessary for eligibility is legitimate, a fraud referral is to be made specifically stating the reason for suspecting its validity and attaching a copy of the potentially fraudulent/altered document.

 

 

Recipient Fraud Penalties

Effective January 1, 1998, persons who have been convicted by a state or federal court or an Administrative Disqualification Hearing will have the following penalties:

 

Permanent

 

·       Individuals who have been convicted of any of the following acts on the first offense:

 

o       Made fraudulent statements or representation regarding their place of residence, in order to receive assistance simultaneously, from two or more states or counties; or

o       Submitted false documents for nonexistent or ineligible children; or

o       Received cash benefits in excess of $10,000 throught fraudulent means

 

·       Individuals convicted of felony fraud, in a state or federal court, including and determination made on the basis of a plea of guilty or nolo contendre, for receipt or attempted receipt of cash aid benefits of $5,000 or more

 

·       Individuals with a third IPV conviction.

 

 

Other Penalties

Five Year Penalty

 

Individuals convicted of felony fraud, in a state or federal court for theft of more than $2,000 but less that $5,000.

 

Four Year Penalty

 

Individuals convicted for the second IPV (submission of more than one application for the same type of aid for the same period of time, for the purpose of receiving more than one grant).

 

Two Year Penalty

 

·       Individuals convicted of felony fraud, in a state or federal court for theft of less than $2,000.

 

·       Individuals convicted for the first IPV (submission of more than one application for the same type of aid for the same period of time, for the purpose of receiving more than one grant).

 

Twelve Month Penalty

 

Individuals convicted for the second IPV (making false or misleading statements or misrepresenting, concealing, or withholding facts, for the purpose of establishing or maintaining the family’s eligibility for aid or increasing, or preventing a reduction in the amount of that aid).

 

Six Month Penalty

 

Individuals convicted for the first IPV (making false or misleading statements or misrepresenting, concealing, or withholding facts, for the purpose of establishing or maintaining the family’s eligibility for aid or increasing, or preventing a reduction in the amount of that aid.)